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Shawnee Indians

Until the 1600's the Shawnee Indians inhabited the Ohio valley. They were driven out by the Iroquois looking for ample hunting grounds. Most Shawnee's went south and east settling in Maryland, Eastern Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and even Florida. Once the fierce warriors of the Iroquois Indians died out, they were able to return to their homeland. This didn't last long as they were drove once again, by the settling Europeans.

The Shawnee Tribe had five divisions with whom they shared language and culture. The entries into each division were by birth inheritance of the father. Although they had five divisions they operated as a whole, Chilahcahtha (Chillicothe), Kispokotha (Kispogogi), Spitotha (Mequachake?), Bicowetha (Piqua), and Assiwikale (Hathawekela) clans made up the tribe. The Chiefs were only able to come from the Chillicothe clan. The Shawnee Indians lived in wigwams made from Sassafras and Birch saplings from the frame and covered with cattail woven mats for walls.

In the early years of the French and Indian war the Shawnees fought with the French until the Treaty of  Easton was signed in 1758. After the Battle of Fallen Timbers  the Shawnee Indians signed the Treaty of Greenville, which gave the United States a large portion of their homeland. In their last attempt to save their land, a minority of Shawnee's formed together for Tecumseh War, which ended at the Battle of Thames in 1813. Their numbers dwindled, from over 10,000 they were now left with 3500. In 1817, with the signing of the Fort Meigs Treaty, the Shawnee Indians signed away their remaining land rights in Ohio. Another treaty followed in 1825. The Missouri Shawnee's signed the Treaty of St. Louis presented to them by William Clark.

There are still approximately 15,000 Shawnee Indians today. Most live in Oklahoma, where they had been moved to, by the American Government. Today there are four bands of Shawnee Indians although only three are recognized amongst the tribe and the government. The Absentee Shawnee, the Eastern Shawnee, the Cherokee Shawnee, and the Shawnee Nation Remnant Band is only recognized by the state of Ohio.



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